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Permitted Development Rear Extension 2023

Updated: Jan 6

Permitteddevelopment.com is here to deliver your project. Please click here to view our website or simply call us on 02071 014730 to start your project today.



Our other useful blog links:


What is Permitted Development 2023

Permitted Development - Home Improvements 2023

Permitted Development - Loft Conversion Guide 2023

Permitted Development - Outbuildings Guide 2023

Permitted Development VS Planning Permission

Permitted Development - Cost Savings in 2023

Permitted Development - The Benefits 2023

Permitted Development - Lawful Development Certificate 2023

Permitted Development - Building Regulations 2023


Are you considering an extension or renovation to your home, but don't want to go through the time and expense of obtaining planning permission? Permitted development rights allow you to make certain changes to your property without the need for planning permission. Our company can help you determine whether your proposed project is eligible for permitted development and guide you through the process of obtaining any necessary approvals. We have a team of experts who are up to date on the latest permitted development rules and regulations and can advise you on what is and is not allowed. Don't risk incurring delays or fines – let us help you navigate the permitted development process and ensure that your project is a success. Contact us today to learn more.


A rear extension under permitted development can be a fantastic way to add extra space and value to your home without the hassle and expense of a full planning application. Permitted development rights allow certain types of development to be carried out without the need to apply for planning permission, and a rear extension may be covered by these rights depending on the location and type of extension being proposed.


One of the major benefits of a rear extension under permitted development is the time and cost savings. By not having to go through the planning application process, you can save time and money that would have been spent on preparing and submitting a planning application, as well as any fees associated with it.


A rear extension can also add extra living space to your home, making it more comfortable and functional for you and your family. Whether you need an extra bedroom, a larger kitchen, or simply a bigger living area, a rear extension can help you create the space you need.


In addition to the practical benefits, a rear extension can also add value to your home. A well-designed extension can not only increase the size of your property, but also enhance its overall appearance and appeal.


Overall, a rear extension under permitted development can be a great way to add value and functionality to your home, while also saving you time and money. If you are considering a rear extension, it is important to check with us at permitteddevelopment.com or your local planning authority to determine what types of development are covered by permitted development rights in your area and to ensure that your proposed extension complies with any relevant requirements.


Why do I need an architect for my project?


An architectural practice can help your project in a number of ways. Some of the services that an architectural practice might offer include:

  1. Design: An architectural practice can help you design your project, whether it is a new build, an extension, a refurbishment, or a conversion. The practice can work with you to understand your vision and create a design that meets your needs and budget.

  2. Planning: An architectural practice can help you navigate the planning process, including preparing and submitting a planning application, dealing with any objections or queries, and negotiating with the planning authorities to secure approval.

  3. Building regulations: An architectural practice can help you comply with building regulations, which set out the standards that must be met in relation to the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings. The practice can advise you on what is required and prepare the necessary documents.

Overall, an architectural practice can provide a range of services to help you successfully deliver your project.


How does permitted development get granted? (Lawful Development Certificate)


A lawful development certificate is a document issued by a local planning authority that confirms that a proposed development or use of land is lawful. It can be used to provide evidence that a development or use complies with planning laws and does not require planning permission.


Lawful development certificates can be useful in a number of situations. For example, if you are considering making changes to your property and you are not sure whether planning permission is required, you can apply for a lawful development certificate to confirm that the proposed changes are permitted. This can provide you with peace of mind and avoid the risk of having to reverse any unauthorised changes at a later date.


Lawful development certificates can also be useful if you are buying or selling a property and you want to confirm that any existing development or use is lawful. This can help to avoid any potential disputes or issues that might arise in the future.


To apply for a lawful development certificate, you will need to submit a written application to your local planning authority, along with any relevant supporting information such as architectural drawings. The authority will then consider the application and, if approved, will issue a certificate. It is important to note that a lawful development certificate only applies to the development or use described in the certificate and does not grant any additional rights or permission for other types of development.


Larger Home Extension Scheme


If you're looking to add a significant amount of space to your home, a larger extension scheme may be the perfect solution. Not only will it increase the value of your property, but it can also provide you with the extra room you need for your growing family or changing lifestyle.


However, it's important to note that larger home extensions scheme may not be covered under permitted development rights, which means prior approval from you local authority is required before proceeding with your plans. Applying for a larger home extension scheme can be complex and time-consuming, so its's a good idea to work with a planning professional such as ourselves who can help navigate the process and increase your chances of success.


When applying for a larger home extension scheme, there are a few key things to consider:


  • The size and location of your property

  • The appearance and design of your extension

  • The materials you plan to use for the extension

  • The potential impact of your extension on your neighbours and the local community

In order to increase your chances of success, it's important to carefully consider these factors and provide detailed plans and drawings to support your application. You may also need to demonstrate that your extension meets local planning policies and guidelines.

Overall, a larger home extension scheme can be a great way to add significant value and functionality to your home. While the process of applying for planning permission can be complex, working with a planning professional and carefully considering the key factors can help you increase your chances of success.


Below is a list of the Permitted Development Rights for a single Storey Rear Extension:


The all important question is... what are your permitted development rights in 2023?

The way the government has written their guidance defines what's not allowed. Extensions on properties under residential dwellings is called Class A permitted development and below are the rules government have written for rear extensions. Click here to speak with one of our specialists to help you with your project today.

Development is not permitted by Class A if...


(A) Permission to use the dwellinghouse as a dwellinghouse has been granted only by virtue of Class [G,] M, [MA,] N, P [PA] or Q of Part 3 of this Schedule (changes of use);


(B) As a result of the works, the total area of ground covered by buildings within the curtilage of the dwellinghouse (other than the original dwellinghouse) would exceed 50% of the total area of the curtilage (excluding the ground area of the original dwellinghouse);


(C) The height of the part of the dwellinghouse enlarged, improved or altered would exceed the height of the highest part of the roof of the existing dwellinghouse;


(D) The height of the eaves of the part of the dwellinghouse enlarged, improved or altered would exceed the height of the eaves of the existing dwellinghouse;


(E) The enlarged part of the dwellinghouse would extend beyond a wall which

(i) Forms the principal elevation of the original dwellinghouse; or

(ii) Fronts a highway and forms a side elevation of the original dwellinghouse;


(F) Subject to paragraph (g), the enlarged part of the dwellinghouse would have a single storey and

(i) Extend beyond the rear wall of the original dwellinghouse by more than 4 metres in the case of a detached dwellinghouse, or 3 metres in the case of any other dwellinghouse, or

(ii) Exceed 4 metres in height;


(G) For a dwellinghouse not on article 2(3) land nor on a site of special scientific interest, the enlarged part of the dwellinghouse would have a single storey and

(i) Extend beyond the rear wall of the original dwellinghouse by more than 8 metres in the case of a detached dwellinghouse, or 6 metres in the case of any other dwellinghouse, or

(ii) Exceed 4 metres in height;


(H) The enlarged part of the dwellinghouse would have more than a single storey and

(i) Extend beyond the rear wall of the original dwellinghouse by more than 3 metres, or

(ii) Be within 7 metres of any boundary of the curtilage of the dwellinghouse being enlarged which is opposite the rear wall of that dwellinghouse;]


(I) The enlarged part of the dwellinghouse would be within 2 metres of the boundary of the curtilage of the dwellinghouse, and the height of the eaves of the enlarged part would exceed 3 metres;


(J) The enlarged part of the dwellinghouse would extend beyond a wall forming a side elevation of the original dwellinghouse, and would

(i) Exceed 4 metres in height,

(ii) Have more than a single storey, or

(iii) Have a width greater than half the width of the original dwellinghouse;


(Ja) Any total enlargement (being the enlarged part together with any existing enlargement of the original dwellinghouse to which it will be joined) exceeds or would exceed the limits set out in sub-paragraphs (e) to (j);


(K) It would consist of or include;

(i) The construction or provision of a verandah, balcony or raised platform,

(ii) The installation, alteration or replacement of a microwave antenna,

(iii) The installation, alteration or replacement of a chimney, flue or soil and vent pipe, or

(iv) An alteration to any part of the roof of the dwellinghouse


These are the rules set out for permitted development rear extensions. They may sound a little complicated however, we have used them for years and for the benefit of our clients we know them inside out.

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